Printing Solar cell on a sheet of Paper

Solar power is a great alternative energy source, but it’s unfortunately a rather expensive one. However, researchers at MIT are working on a new and less-expensive way to make solar cells which involves printing them directly on to fabric or paper.

We’re not talking about any fancy paper or fabrics. The MIT researchers discovered the printing process works on just about any paper, from regular printer paper, to tissue paper, and even to already-printed newspaper. However, printing the cells is not as simple. It must be done in a vacuum-tight room where the special “ink” is deposited on the paper. According to an article by MIT’s David L. Chandler, the process is almost as cheap and as easy as printing a photo on your inkjet.

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Hydrogen powered E-bone concept bus

Here is a peep into the technology of the future – the E-Bone concept bus. Unlike conventional buses, the E-bone bus will be powered by hydrogen fuel cells. This greatly eliminate the pollution hazards created by a large number of buses plying in big cities, running on conventional diesl fuel, emitting carbon.

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Sky Garden House

I think one of the reasons that many are skeptical about environmental design is because they think its terribly complex and costly. It does take a bit more effort on the front end, but it’s definitely not rocket science. This architecture by Guz Architectsis a wonderfully developed minimalistic design with a curvilinear flare that really brings out the organic coverings. I’m most impressed with how design facilitates the needs of the plants and shrubs located throughout the house.

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Solar Forest (Amazing Concept)


Designer Neville Mars has designed a charging station that keeps your car both cool and charged.

Called the Solar Forest, the panels actually follow the sun throughout the day for maximum efficiency. And that canopy provides some much needed shade for the cars below, hopefully while keeping the overlap to a minimum.

The tree trunks are like a giant power strips for electric vehicles. Cars can just plug in and cool off.

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A yacht – Designed to save energy

Feadship comes up trumps with a new concept superyacht every year, and this year’s Breathe design doesn’t fail on the sleek good looks the Dutch company has become known for. Supposedly inspired by zebras, it may be lacking in black and white stripes but it’s the cooling system which has made it from beast to machine. The hulls are lighter, with funnels darker, to flow the air through the decks, cooling passengers down.

 

 

Glass shells also act as insulation, cooling the insides while generating energy from the sun at the same time.

Toyota launches five “plug-in Hybrid” concepts for trial

The concept cars in question us a conventional petrol engine along with an electric motor. The electric motor is powered by lithium-ion batteries and can drive the car without the use of the petrol engine for up to 20km. If the electricity ‘runs out’ the car can continue to be driven like a normal petrol vehicle.

Toyota says the batteries can be recharged in around 100 minutes through an external power socket.

The Victorian Electric Vehicle Trial by Toyota has been launched in Melbourne earlier today. Five concept vehicles will be given to government and local businesses to test their effectiveness within the infrastructure.

Max Yasuda, Toyota Australia President and CEO, said about the launch,

As a leader in the automotive industry and the development of low emissions vehicles, Toyota Australia is pleased to be giving Victorians the chance to drive the concept plug-in hybrid.

Thnx.

There Is Such Thing As Dry Water

Powdered material called "dry water" could provide a new way to store carbon dioxide in an effort to fight global warming. (Credit: Ben Carter)

Don’t ask me what voodoo they used but scientists have created dry water. Well, they originally invented it back in 1968 but they’ve recently re-discovered it and this time, found an actual use for it.

First, dry water, how does that even make sense? Ben Carter, Ph.D, the researcher, explains:

[It’s] known as “dry water” because it consists of 95 percent water and yet is a dry powder. Each powder particle contains a water droplet surrounded by modified silica, the stuff that makes up ordinary beach sand. The silica coating prevents the water droplets from combining and turning back into a liquid. The result is a fine powder that can slurp up gases, which chemically combine with the water molecules to form what chemists term a hydrate.

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